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Articles
Published: 2023-05-23

Investigation of the effects of kinesiophobia level on physical activity and quality of life in university students

Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ankara Medipol University, Ankara, Turkey.
Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ankara Medipol University, Ankara, Turkey.
Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ankara Medipol University, Ankara, Turkey.
Department of Therapy and Rehabilitation, Programme of Physiotherapy, Vocational School of Health Services, Ankara Medipol University, Ankara, Turkey
Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences, Ankara Medipol University, Ankara, Turkey.
Department of Physiotherapy and Rehabilitation, Faculty of Health Sciences, İstanbul Okan University, İstanbul, Turkey

Abstract

Background: Kinesiophobia, which is called activity avoidance, is a condition that may cause university students to stay away from physical activity more. This study aimed to understand how physical activity and quality of life levels of university students with different levels of kinesiophobia are affected. 

Methods: Our study included 395 students who were studying at Ankara Medipol University in the 2022-2023 academic year and were accepted to participate in our study. The kinesiophobia, physical activity, and quality of life levels of the students were evaluated with questionnaires. The Demographic Characteristics of Students were analyzed using Chi-Square and Mann-Whitney U tests. Spearman correlation analysis was used for the correlation between the scores of the scales, and Mann-Whitney U was used for comparing physical activity levels and quality of life according to kinesiophobia levels. Statistical significance was set as p<0.05.

Results: Among the students who participated in our study, 226 (57.22%) students had high kinesiophobia levels and 169 (42.78%) had low kinesiophobia levels. While 74.3% of people with high kinesiophobia levels were women, 67.5% of participants with low kinesiophobia levels were women. The age and BMI levels of the participants in both groups were similar (p>0.05). In our study, while all parameters of WHOQOL and TKS were correlated with each other, only physical and psychosocial sub-parameters of WHOQOL and IPAQ were correlated (p<0.05). According to the results obtained from the study, the physical activity amount and quality of life scores of the students with lower kinesiophobia levels were found to be higher (p<0.05).

Conclusion: As a result, different levels of kinesiophobia in university students can affect the amount of physical activity and quality of life of students. It is essential to keep students away from the vicious circle of kinesiophobia and lack of physical activity and to direct them to physical activities.



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How to Cite

1.
Bulguroglu HI, Bulguroglu M, Dincer S, Gevrek C, Zorlu S, Kendal K. Investigation of the effects of kinesiophobia level on physical activity and quality of life in university students. jidhealth [Internet]. 2023 May 23 [cited 2024 Apr. 15];6(2):847-53. Available from: https://www.jidhealth.com/index.php/jidhealth/article/view/280