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Articles
Published: 2021-09-30

Resilience, fear of COVID-19 and their relationship with cognitive functioning and mood: a study on the administrative staff of the University of Western Macedonia, Greece

Department of Psychology, University of Western Macedonia, Florina, Greece
Department of Psychology, University of Western Macedonia, Florina, Greece
Department of Psychology, University of Western Macedonia, Florina, Greece
Department of Psychology, University of Western Macedonia, Florina, Greece
Department of Psychology, University of Western Macedonia, Florina, Greece
COVID-19, Resilience, Fear of COVID-19, Mood, Cognitive Functioning, Administrators, Greece

Abstract

Background: The present study examines the relationship between resilience, mood, fear for Covid-19, and cognitive functioning during pandemic Covid-19. 

Methods: A cross-sectional web-based study was conducted from December 2020 to January 2021 among the administrative staff of the University of Western Macedonia, Greece. Data was collected using the Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale (CD-RISC), Depression, Anxiety, and Stress (DASS 21), fear of Covid-19 scales (FCV-19S), and Cognitive functioning self-assessment scale (CFSS). Univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analysis was performed using an independent Sample T-Test, Chi-Square Test, One-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U Test, Kruskal-Wallis H Test, Spearman's Rank-Order Correlations, Pearson product-moment correlations, and Simple Linear Regression. SPSS version 22 was used for data analysis and the statistical significance was considered at less than 0.05.

Results: Data of 88 university's administrative staff has undergone final analysis. Most of the respondents were females (78.4%), married (61.3%), middle-aged group (64.8%), held a post-graduate degree (56.8%) and 94.3% stated that they had not been sick with Covid-19. Our findings showed that the middle-aged group has statistically significantly higher fear on Covid-19 (P = 0.046), and more care of personal hygiene, stress (P = 0.040), than the young age group respectively. Women had a statistically significantly higher restriction to physical contact compared to men (P = 0.042), however, men had statistically significantly more trusted the results of clinical trials of Covid-19 vaccines than women (P = 0.039), respectively. There was statistically significant and negative correlation between Resilience (CD) and cognitive functioning (r = -0.412, n = 87, P < 0.001). Furthermore, the result of a simple linear regression showed that an increase of one in CD corresponded to a 0.287 decrease in cognitive functioning.

Conclusion: It is vital to continue monitoring the psychological and cognitive effects of the Covid-19 pandemic.



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How to Cite

1.
Flora K, Georgiadou T, Megari K, Grigoropoulos I, Chasiotis V. Resilience, fear of COVID-19 and their relationship with cognitive functioning and mood: a study on the administrative staff of the University of Western Macedonia, Greece. jidhealth [Internet]. 2021 Sep. 30 [cited 2022 Aug. 15];4(Special3):458-565. Available from: https://www.jidhealth.com/index.php/jidhealth/article/view/157